FAQs

Q: What do the numbers on the side of my tyre mean? It says 235/45R17 94W?
A: All these numbers combine together to give you the width, profile, rim size, load and speed rating.
235= Over all tyre width in millimetres
45= The aspect ratio or profile of your tyre. This determines the sidewall height of your tyre as a percentage of the tyre width. In this case, the height of the sidewall is 45% of 235mm
R= Radial construction
17= Rim diameter in inches
94= Load rating index. How much load each tyre can carry. A tyre with a 94 load rating can carry 670kg
W= Speed symbol category. A W rated tyre has been tested as being safe and strong enough to maintain 270 km/h

Q: When should I replace my tyres?
A: The legal minimum depth of tread in New Zealand is 1.5mm. Many other countries in the world the legal minimum is 3mm including the UK and Australia. The NZ Police also have a minimum tread depth on all Police vehicles of 3mm. We would recommend serious consideration of all tyres below 3mm of tread depth for replacement for all weather safety.

Q: My steering wheel is shaking. What does that mean?
A: A steering wheel that is shaking at a constant road speed indicates that your wheels need balancing. Wheels are balanced when they are first fitted to a car, but balance changes over time due to many factors.

Q: My car is pulling in on direction. What does that mean?
A: An excessive pull or a crooked steering wheel, are indicators of a vehicle requiring a wheel alignment. This is something all vehicles will require every 15,000-20,000 kilometres for even tyre wear, precise steering and predictable handling.

Q: Where do my old tyres go? Are they disposed of responsibly?
A: All scrap tyres from Tyre Master are collected by a firm that cuts the tyres up in to various grades of rubber chip for a multitude of end uses, for example equestrian arenas. The company is regularly audited by Environment Waikato for best practice systems, to ensure no impact on the environment.

Q: I have a flat tyre. Can I have it repaired?
A: In most cases, yes you can. A properly inspected and repaired tyre should go on for the rest of its life with no issues at all. There are of course many criterior that the tyre must satisfy before it is able to be repaired, for example repairs are not allowed in the sidewall of a tyre.